3 Daily Activities to Help Kids Handle Their Emotions

3 Daily Activities to Help Kids Handle Their Emotions

Navigating our feelings is a lifelong journey, but we can show kids how to get started on it right.  The shows you watch, books you read, games you play and conversations you have as a family make a big difference in how your little one connects with their emotions and with the world around them. Emotions change frequently throughout the day. One moment, your child may be filled with pride and joy as they share a painting they've been working hard on. But the next can be filled with disappointment, anger and sadness when a cup of spilled water ruins the painting. Navigating our feelings is a lifelong journey. We can support young children in learning important skills like self-awareness, communication and empathizing with others by embedding simple opportunities to identify and express emotions in our daily interactions. Normalize Sharing Feelings as a Family Looking back to your own childhood,... Read more

Kids’ Ability To Manage Emotion Is Linked to Their Parents

It is estimated that 7% of the child population suffers from developmental language disorder Promoting spaces to work on emotional development can facilitate children's expressiveness and empathyProblems when talking, communicating and expressing feelings are common among children and adolescents, in particular at an early age. These difficulties increase in the case of those diagnosed with developmental language disorder, which affects approximately 7% of the child population. A recent study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology, by researchers from the Cognition and Language Research Group (GRECIL), included in the eHealth Center at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and the University of Barcelona (UB), has analysed the existence of differences in emotional regulation in children and adolescents who have been diagnosed with specific language impairment / developmental language disorder (SLI/DLD). "There are still few studies that assess the emotional and social dimension of the child and adolescent population with... Read more

Neuroscience of New Fatherhood: Empathy, Bonding, Childcare

A father's ability to empathize and mentalize during pregnancy correlates with later bonding and parenting during infancy. Specific brain areas in expectant fathers affect social information processing, self-awareness, emotion regulation, and cognitive control. While the role of mothers in child-rearing has historically drawn attention, more recently researchers are examining the impact of fathers on child development. Even before the baby is born, the idea of who they could be takes shape in the mind of expectant parents, to varying degrees shaping the ultimate attachment parents will have once the baby is born, for all parents. In this piece, we will look at recent research on how fathers' empathic attunement and associated brain connectivity during mid to late pregnancy with the first child correlates with bonding and parenting behavior at 6 months following birth. For instance, recent research has identified four key aspects of becoming a father (2021): the “trigger moment”... Read more

We are not OK: Pandemic survey finds moms are burnt out, overwhelmed

Moms across the country are sending out an SOS! A survey conducted by TODAY Parents found that 83% of moms are feeling burnt out by pandemic parenting. "My mental health was really suffering for a while," New York mom Michelle Hudson shared. "Being a parent isn’t easy to begin with, but then add on being contained in a home, limiting social interactions, working full time and taking care of the household." More than two-thirds of moms (69%) reported feeling overwhelmed, according to our online, unscientific survey of more than 1,200 moms, and 64% shared that the past year has been extremely hard. Elizabeth Jenkins Madaris, a mom of two in Colorado, became a stay-at-home mom because of the pandemic. "I had a baby in February 2020, moved cross country in March 2020, attempted to start working full time in August, but had to end up quitting because the kids' daycare... Read more

Child Sleep Problems Affect Mothers and Fathers Differently

After the birth of children, fragmentation of parental night sleep and fatigue due to the nightly demands of the infant are common.1 Indeed, there is evidence that mothers’ and fathers’ fatigue increase immediately following the birth of their child.1,2 Resulting in insufficient, non-restful sleep, this poses a stress factor for parental health, daily well-being, and functioning.3 In contrast, good children’s sleep quality predicted good maternal sleep.4 Most often, this is a temporary problem and infants develop the competence to fall asleep independently in the evening and go back to sleep after night waking during the first year of life.5,6 However, about 20–30% of the infants and young children are affected by sleep problems during the entire first 3 years of childhood and need support by a caregiver to fall asleep.7–10 Consequently, many parents are concerned with difficulties pertaining to their own sleep as well as handling their children’s sleep problems.... Read more

Gifted People Can Be Wounded Too

Most people would not think of being highly sensitive, empathic, intelligent, insightful, and inquisitive as a cause for childhood trauma. Apart from being the target of envy and being the unwelcomed truth-teller in any social group, the biggest potential source of trauma for emotionally, intellectually, or spiritually gifted people often comes from their families. Here are some of the less-known gifted trauma: 1. Subtle Rejection of the Gifted The first layer of wounds for gifted people comes from their parents’ implicit rejection of them. Your parents may feel intimidated by your penetrative insights. In one way or the other, they may have felt a sense that you can see through them—their vulnerabilities, hypocrisies, mistakes, and weaknesses—everything they would normally hide from their children. They might have felt threatened by your speed, insights, honesty, and intelligence. To protect themselves, they put a wall up and pulled back. For a child, however,... Read more

Children's ability to manage emotions is linked to that of their parents

Children’s ability to manage emotions is linked to that of their parents

Problems when talking, communicating and expressing feelings are common among children and adolescents, in particular at an early age. These difficulties increase in the case of those diagnosed with developmental language disorder, which affects approximately 7% of the child population. A recent study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology, by researchers from the Cognition and Language Research Group (GRECIL), included in the eHealth Center at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and the University of Barcelona (UB), has analysed the existence of differences in emotional regulation in children and adolescents who have been diagnosed with specific language impairment / developmental language disorder (SLI/DLD). "There are still few studies that assess the emotional and social dimension of the child and adolescent population with SLI/DLD, which is why we wanted to delve into the study of emotional regulation in this population," said Nadia Ahufinger, lead co-author of the research along... Read more

How to Break the Exhausting Habit of Revenge Bedtime Procrastination

How to Break the Exhausting Habit of Revenge Bedtime Procrastination

What Is Revenge Bedtime Procrastination? Revenge bedtime procrastination is the act of deliberately putting off sleep in favor of leisure activities — binging Netflix or scrolling TikTok, for example — that provide short-term enjoyment but few long-term life benefits. Revenge bedtime procrastination is especially likely when busy schedules and daily responsibilities prevent the enjoyment of “me time” earlier in the day. (The idea is that you’re exacting “revenge” on all of life’s stressors and obligations by delaying sleep for leisure and entertainment.) Of course, sacrificing sleep carries its fair share of consequences — namely exhaustion, poor productivity, health ramifications, and shame. In short, revenge bedtime procrastination is an unhealthy habit – and one that may be more common and troublesome for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD). Revenge Bedtime Procrastination: Origins, Signs, and Impact Revenge bedtime procrastination is the approximate English translation of a Chinese expression for... Read more

Does Social-Emotional Learning Help Students Who Could Benefit the Most? We Don’t Know

Does Social-Emotional Learning Help Students Who Could Benefit the Most?

Let’s talk about what we know about social and emotional learning from the research. SEL is understood as an interrelated set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and strategies that underscore how we learn, form, and maintain supportive relationships; make empathetic and equitable decisions; and thrive both physically and psychologically. Students today are more anxious, less connected, and more likely to have experienced trauma—a threat to their safety, agency, dignity, and belonging—than they were two years ago. And these experiences have been most profound for students marginalized by race, ethnicity, and ability. These students are more likely than their peers to have had their learning interrupted, be underserved, experience the loss of loved ones, and have their household income negatively impacted during the pandemic. Fortunately, a significant portion of the $190 billion allocated by Congress to the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief fund must be specifically used to “respond... Read more

How Parents Can Keep Kids Talking and Protect Mental Health

How Parents Can Keep Kids Talking and Protect Mental Health

My community is grieving. Everyone knows someone who has been affected by the suicides this past month in our local high schools. “That was the fifth suicide this month,” one distressed mother told me. “They were successful kids; some were top athletes. I worry for my kids. How can I keep them talking to me so this doesn’t happen to us?” Her kids were in elementary school. Parents know that keeping our kids talking to us is one of the most important things we can do. But how can we make sure that happens? There are specific and actionable steps parents can take to create a culture of open communication in their families. If parents set the right tone, kids will keep talking. When parents provide support, they can make a huge difference in their child’s mental health. Mental Health Crisis in Our Youth Kids and adolescents have just faced... Read more

How are teachers using psychology in the classroom?

How are teachers using psychology in the classroom?

A child is not a statistic, roll number or a brick in the wall. Every child has a unique way to process life and learning and to impose a one-size-fits-all teaching methodology is insensitive and short-sighted. Research has repeatedly proven that every individual has a certain learning style that is informed by their upbringing, background, social and personal experiences. As educators, if we cannot address every nuance in a child’s personality, we can at least make an effort to understand the basics of educational psychology to help children learn better. Labelling and castigating children for ‘acting out,’ ‘being difficult,’ calling them ‘emotionally unstable’ and making a bad example out of them is not unusual in schools. The damage this does to the delicate psyche of the child is inestimable. Labels like ‘slow’, ‘disruptive’ and ‘inattentive’ can scar a child forever. Educational psychology is an attempt to approach a child with... Read more

In This Together During "Mixed-Up" Times

In This Together During “Mixed-Up” Times

The holiday season is a time for people to come together, take time off, and recharge. Unfortunately it can also be a time of conflict, busyness, and stress. During "mixed-up" times like the COVID-19 pandemic, people have a greater need of the former — but a greater chance of the latter. James Anderson, PhD, offers this reminder that in difficult times like these, everyone benefits from self-care and being patient and understanding with others. In This Together As we move through our brief time on earth, we experience a broad range of emotions — joy, sorrow, anger, excitement, and anxiety, among others. Occasionally, we are enveloped by a single, strong emotion; more often, we experience multiple emotions at once. "Daddy," says my nearly five-year-old daughter when she recognizes this strange collage of emotion, "I am feeling mixed-up." We live in mixed-up times. As fall continues, we grapple with the weighty... Read more

Easy Video Reviews

{{startingCount}}
{{time(finishingCount)}}
{{trans(`You have no camera installed on your device or the device is currently being used by other application`)}}
{{trans(`Please try visiting this page with a valid SSL certificate`)}}
{{trans(`You can record up to %s minutes, don't worry you will review your video before sending`, time(preference.limits))}}
{{trans('Seconds')}}
{{trans(`You can record up to %s minutes, don't worry you will review your video before sending`, time(preference.limits))}}
{{trans('Uploading video...')}}
{{send.message}}

{{trans('Upload video')}}

{{trans('Drag your files here or click in this area')}}
{{uploader.file}} {{uploader.size}} x
English