Mental health in the workplace: The coming revolution

Lenny Mendonca, the former chief economic and business advisor to California governor Gavin Newsom, went public with why he had suddenly resigned from that position on April 10. Mendonca, a former McKinsey senior partner, revealed his struggles with debilitating depression in a deeply personal column that also probed the pervasiveness of mental health issues among the general population and the public-policy implications of untreated mental illness. Three weeks prior to his resignation, suffering severe depression, Mendonca had checked into a hospital for an overnight stay. But, acting in his position of great responsibility, in the middle of the COVID-19 crisis, Mendonca had “told myself and my team that we all have to operate at 120 percent. . . . This meant 80-hour work weeks and barely sleeping.” Reflecting on his diagnosis and months-long process of recovery, Mendonca wrote: “What does it say about me that I have a mental health... Read more

How to Help Young Children Build Resilience

How to Help Young Children Build Resilience

Decades of research have documented serious consequences from chronic stress in childhood (McEwen, 2011). But psychologists have identified ways in which parents teach children how to cope with adversity—an idea commonly known as resilience. The Effects of Childhood Stress Children cannot be protected from everything. Parents get divorced. Children grow up in poverty. Friends or loved ones are injured, fall ill, or die. Kids can experience neglect, physical or emotional abuse, or bullying. Families immigrate, end up homeless or live through natural disasters. There can be long-term consequences (Masten et al., 1990). Hardship in childhood can physically alter the brain architecture of a developing child. It can impair cognitive and social-emotional development, impacting learning, memory, decision-making, and more. Some children develop emotional problems, act out with aggressive or disruptive behavior, form unhealthy relationships, or end up in trouble with the law. School performance often suffers, ultimately limiting job and income... Read more

How to teach kids to be mindful

How to teach kids to be mindful

Mindfulness can regulate children's emotions by being more balanced because they are focused on the here and now. There are plenty of perks to being a child – no bills, little responsibility. But do you know the worst part? You have no idea what you are feeling. You may lash out and be branded a trouble maker, hide yourself and be labelled shy, or just keep sweating the small stuff because you don’t know that what you are feeling is overwhelmed and sometimes, that’s just as common as breathing. Unresolved, unarticulated feelings can create a tsunami of rage in a person; in a child, even more so. The experts believe this is where mindfulness comes in. Mandeep Jassal, Behavioural Therapist, Priory Wellbeing Centre, explains: “Mindfulness is a practical and simple way of noticing things around us that we don't usually notice. Mindfulness for children can help train their attention back... Read more

How to Help Young Children Build Resilience

How to Help Young Children Build Resilience

Between the global COVID-19 pandemic, the associated economic downturn, last year was difficult for everyone. Decades of research have documented serious consequences from chronic stress in childhood. But psychologists have identified ways in which parents teach children how to cope with adversity. Here's how to teach children resilience in the new year. Between the global COVID-19 pandemic, the associated economic downturn, and widespread protests over racism, the last few years have been difficult for everyone. Many people are struggling, consumed with anxiety and stress, and finding themselves unable to sleep or focus. As a developmental psychologist and researcher on anxiety and fear in infants and young children, I have been particularly concerned about the impact of the pandemic on young people’s mental health. Many have not physically been in school consistently since March of 2020. They’re isolated from friends and relatives. Some fear that they or loved ones will contract... Read more

Social Emotional Learning Skills by Grade Level, Part I

Social Emotional Learning Skills by Grade Level, Part I

Social and emotional (SEL) skills involve more than just the concepts surrounding educational buzzwords like growth mindset, grit, and self-advocacy. SEL skills are being emphasized at an even greater extent now that students are limited in their opportunities to socialize, collaborate, and communicate with peers in person. Distance learning and virtual schooling created various obstacles for students when it comes to developing and growing their SEL skills. For this reason, SEL has become an even greater focus for school districts, parents, and educators. Besides providing resources for building SEL skills at home, it is equally important for families to be able to determine if children are reaching specific grade-level SEL standards. In the following series, we’ll discuss each of the SEL skills students should have by grade level to provide a helpful resource for parents and educators alike. Early Elementary Grades (K-3) As expected, the SEL skills required for student... Read more

How to Teach Older Students Social-Emotional Skills? Try Civics

How to Teach Older Students Social-Emotional Skills? Try Civics

Civic engagement is the oil that keeps the gears of democracy working. But what exactly are the behaviors of an engaged citizen? Understanding other points of view, solving problems collaboratively, and building relationship skills may all come to mind. For many educators, those skills will sound familiar, because they’re many of the same taught through social-emotional learning. Not only are the skills cultivated through social-emotional learning the same behaviors that power civic engagement, but the reverse is also true: Civic engagement can be a meaningful way to teach and reinforce social and emotional skills. That’s especially true for middle and high schoolers who are searching for their place in their communities and the world and might not otherwise connect with traditional social-emotional lessons, said Jenna Ryall, the director of Civics for All, an initiative of the New York City department of education to promote civic engagement in the city’s schools.... Read more

4 Social-Emotional Practices to Help Students Flourish Now

4 Social-Emotional Practices to Help Students Flourish Now

Stephanie Jones is the Gerald S. Lesser Professor in early-childhood development at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education. She is the primary author of the July 2021 report “Navigating SEL from the Inside Out: Looking Inside & Across 33 Leading SEL Programs, A Practical Resource for Schools and OST Providers, Revised and Expanded 2nd edition,” commissioned by the Wallace Foundation. Unpredictable. That is how I would describe the last two school years. But there is one thing I would predict about the year that’s just started: It will be just as turbulent, if not more so. So, what can teachers (and parents) do to help children feel stable, safe, and ready to learn? My counsel is to return to social and emotional learning fundamentals by using strategies from evidence-based SEL learning programs designed for schools and other settings. This summer, I was the lead author on a comprehensive review of... Read more

Suicide attempts by children have spiked during the pandemic, especially among girls

Suicide attempts by children have spiked during the pandemic, especially among girls

Five years ago, if a child younger than 13 arrived at Maine Medical Center for treatment following a suicide attempt, it was rare and notable. It’s no longer rare. If your life or someone else’s life is in immediate danger, dial 911. For immediate assistance during a mental health crisis, call or text the Maine 24-Hour Crisis Hotline at 888-568-1112. For any other support or referrals, call the NAMI Maine Help Line at 800-464-5767 or email helpline@namimaine.org. National resources are also available. The number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. You can also contact the National Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741. Warning signs of teen suicide might include: Talking about suicide, including making statements like “I’m going to kill myself” or “I won’t be a problem for you much longer” Withdrawing from social contact Having mood swings Increased use of alcohol or drugs Feeling trapped,... Read more

Caregiving Is Crucial: How To Support Caregivers And Why It Matters So Much

Caregiving Is Crucial: How To Support Caregivers And Why It Matters So Much

Caregiving has always been important to families, friends and communities, but over the last year and a half, caregiving has escalated in its value and significance. The necessity for caregiving has intensified, the definition of caregiving has expanded and its impact on life and work has increased. All of this puts new stressors on people and their employers—and new rewards as well. Far from just a drain or a demand, caregiving is a complex and mixed experience which requires understanding, focus and intentional support. New Definitions In the popular press, caregiving is often defined as care provided to elders—including everything from housekeeping and personal care to transportation and non-professional medical support (giving meds, etc.). According to the American Geriatrics Society, 30% of people 65 and older receive help. And 65% of this care is provided by unpaid caregivers including friends, family or neighbors. But a full definition of caregiving also... Read more

How To Identify Relational Aggression, The Type Of Emotional Bullying That Affects Younger Girls

How To Identify Relational Aggression, The Type Of Emotional Bullying That Affects Younger Girls

Emotional bullying may not be something you knew about. But, if you have a young daughter, sister, or friend, have you ever experienced her coming home from school feeling both confused and upset? Through some careful questions, you may have discerned that she's being bullied. And not by a stranger but someone she considered a good friend. It's not uncommon for young girls to experience having a close friend suddenly decide to ignore them and talk about them behind their backs. Sometimes, those so-called friends will act nice to the victim but suddenly shift gears when around other peers. As a result, your daughter is the target of jokes made at her expense, which greatly impacts her self-esteem and mental health. This type of "emotional bullying" is known as relational aggression. Physical bullying mainly relies on physical violence. But, this type of bullying involves relationships, the core of what every... Read more

How Teachers Can Use Simone Biles’ Show of Social-Emotional Self-Care in Their Classrooms

How Teachers Can Use Simone Biles’ Show of Social-Emotional Self-Care in Their Classrooms

Simone Biles’ decision to withdraw from a series of Olympics competitions last month care for her mental health was surprising and transformative. The move, especially by an Olympic athlete who is considered one of the greatest the world has ever seen, was more influential and inspiring than any athletic feat thus far. The gymnast’s withdrawal from the competition emphasizes the importance of holistic self care and should inspire us to think about how we can practice taking care of our own selves and supporting those around us — our children, our colleagues, and our family members — to do the same. When we’re feeling unwell, it’s hard to be the best version of ourselves. The “ twisties ” can take many different forms and the connection between mental health, social emotional wellness, and performance is real. (Biles later re-entered the competition and won a Bronze medal on the balance beam.)... Read more

What Is Resilience?

What Is Resilience?

SPECIAL REPORT: EXPLORING RESILIENCY In our psychiatric practices, we naturally focus on psychopathology and the negative effects that adverse and traumatic experiences have on our patients’ mental health. We assess disaster survivors’ maladjustment in order to develop policies for mental health recovery programs. However, the majority of individuals exposed to disasters or other traumatic events do not develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or another lasting psychiatric disorder, although they may experience temporary ripples on the surface of their emotional lives and subclinical symptoms for a time. Resiliency and Posttraumatic Growth: Cultural Implications for Psychiatrists Resilience and Healthy Aging Igor Linkov, PhD, MSc; Stephanie Galaitsi, MSEE; Katarzyna Klasa, MPH, BSN; Andrew Wister, PhD In considering the patients seen by my residents and me, I am often in awe of the tremendous strength that many of them have developed despite experiencing horrific abuse, neglect, disasters, extreme poverty, major losses, and other traumatic... Read more

Easy Video Reviews

{{startingCount}}
{{time(finishingCount)}}
{{trans(`You have no camera installed on your device or the device is currently being used by other application`)}}
{{trans(`Please try visiting this page with a valid SSL certificate`)}}
{{trans(`You can record up to %s minutes, don't worry you will review your video before sending`, time(preference.limits))}}
{{trans('Seconds')}}
{{trans(`You can record up to %s minutes, don't worry you will review your video before sending`, time(preference.limits))}}
{{trans('Uploading video...')}}
{{send.message}}

{{trans('Upload video')}}

{{trans('Drag your files here or click in this area')}}
{{uploader.file}} {{uploader.size}} x
English