Confidence

Nurturing Healthy Self Esteem in Children | curaJOY

Confidence is a social emotional skill and can be nurtured, practiced, and learned. It helps children feel secure, capable and high-achieving. A University of Melbourne study showed a definite, positive correlation between belief in oneself and success or achievement. Confident children grow up to become successful adults, empowered to face life’s challenges and achieve their most lofty goals.

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Studies show that primary school children who were confident performed better at school and bagged academic achievements regardless of their age, cognitive ability, and gender. Like Rome, confidence isn’t built in a day. It requires a nurturing environment, the right training, and consistent practice and encouragement. curaJOY games and comics employ a scientifically based and systematic approach to building confidence starting with guided practice with professional feedback in social initiation, peer interaction, and confronting bullies.

Confidence nears the top of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. The need for respect, esteem, and confidence, is a requirement for all well-functioning human beings. When your child’s basic needs for survival are met, giving them opportunities to feel justly praised, recognized, and competent helps facilitate healthy development. Every parent wants the best for their children, and confidence is at the core. We have taken the mystery out of building confidence by developing programs that work and re-invented them in interactive games and comics to eliminate the struggle. There is no trait that replaces confidence in children and adults. That is, if your child communicates well and demonstrates self-discipline and empathy, he will still need to develop his self-confidence in order to achieve success. At curaJOY, we help parents raise confident children who trust themselves, are comfortable in their own skin, and aren’t afraid to go for their goals, starting from social initiation.

“You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind. “
-Dale Carnegie

How confident are you?

Preview of the foundational skills we teach

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

COLLABORATION

Determine who is available and compatible

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

SOCIAL INITIATION

Overcome shyness and social anxiety. Find friends with similar interests and values.

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

PERSEVERENCE

Positively initiate a conversation with a group after being rejected

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

PARTICIPATION

Ask to join a game already in progress. Be flexible when things change.

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

ETIQUETTE

Interrupt and leave a conversation appropriately

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

INDEPENDENCE

Decide whether to play with a group, another peer, or by yourself

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

The World Belongs To Those Who Believe In Themselves!

In a recent study, children who had a positive but inaccurate perception of their performance were more susceptible to being depressed than those who had a more realistic rating of their performance. Undeserved praise can lead to a flawed portrayal of oneself, which may eventually lead to poor self-esteem. Rather than dishing out unwarranted or unmerited praise, parents can encourage children by urging them to stretch and grow, trying new things, and challenging themselves often.

Emotional Intelligence Games

Gamified cognitive psychology principles | Effectively improve social and emotional intelligence

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo Academy

$ 25 / year

5 TO 7 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo U

$ 25 / year

7 TO 11 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

6
out of 10 top
skills

concluded by the World Economic Forum as integral for success are social and emotional

11%
increase

in academic performance as a result of social emotional learning

As part of the Tatler SOS Experts’ Corner, we delve into the subject of legal arrangements surrounding relationships. Here, Adèle Ballantyne from Eleda Consultancy shares her advice on managing a peaceful divorce without causing harm to your children. When we have, as children, witnessed our parent’s painful relationship breakdown, it often leaves deep emotional scars…

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Here are some disturbing facts: In the US, the suicide rate for men (25/100,000) is over 3 times the rate for women (7.5/100,000) *. FBI records indicate that 98% of mass shootings are done by men (women account for only 9 of the 250 mass shootings from 2000 to 2017). Surprisingly, the solution to both…

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Recent research from the Kaiser Family Fund reports that more than 25% of high school students experienced worsening emotional and cognitive health during since March 2020, and more than 20% of parents with children ages 5-12 reported similar worsening conditions for their children. As we move into the new school year, helping to provide our…

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Often, it seems as though we are the playthings of emotions, particularly strong ones. They overtake our bodies and minds, and all we can do is act on them or wait for them to pass, and the waiting may be difficult. William James, in Varieties of Religious Experience , writes similarly: Emotional occasions, especially violent…

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(CNN)Caring for younger kids is often intensely physical, but with older kids, it can be intensely emotional. Why? Because there are just so many decisions to make, and in a world with a shrinking middle class, rising home prices, and a fiery social, political and natural climate, everything feels high stakes. For those of us…

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A new study my colleagues and I just published (Gleason et al., 2021) provides insight into how play influences a child’s physiological development, specifically vagal tone. Our studies overall examine the effects of our species’ developmental system, or evolved nest, on child and adult well-being (physiological, social, moral). Self-directed free play with others, especially others…

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ow do teens learn the important skill of empathy, which researchers say is vital for building a more compassionate society? Writing for The Conversation , Jessica Stern, a postdoctoral research fellow in psychology at the University of Virginia, describes the results of a newly published study she and colleagues conducted in the lab of Joseph…

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Anxiety and depression are increasing among children, and it’s not just the pandemic causing the uptick. According to the State of the World’s Children report published by UNICEF, more than 40% of children ages 10-19 across the globe suffer from a mental health illness. In the United States, depression among 12- to 17-year-olds has increased…

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Whether you collect new friends easily or lean on a few, long-term friendships dating back to kindergarten, there’s no wrong way to build relationships. This is true especially for people with ADHD, who often report that their symptoms complicate, challenge, and color friendships. The ones that work are the ones that accept and celebrate their…

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When my oldest son, now nearly 13, was born in July of 2008, I thought I could easily balance my career and my desire to be far more engaged at home than my father and his generation were. I was wrong. Almost immediately, I noticed how social policies, schools and health care systems all make…

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Once purchased, your child may play freely on any internet browsers at home or in school. There is no special app to download.  Remember to make sure that device’s speakers or headphones are working properly as dialogue and tone of voice are important in our games.  Younger children should spend about 15-30 minutes per session…

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Women are not domestic servants; they may also have a professional life of their own and children should be able to understand this fact from an early age. Working moms face real pressure Motherhood is something most of us look forward to, with us preparing for it in the pursuit of happiness, but honestly, nothing…

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Preview of the foundational skills we teach

Training List

COLLABORATION

Determine who is available and compatible

Training List

SOCIAL INITIATION

Overcome shyness and social anxiety. Find friends with similar interests and values.

Training List

PERSEVERENCE

Positively initiate a conversation with a group after being rejected

Training List

PARTICIPATION

Ask to join a game already in progress. Be flexible when things change. 

Training List

ETIQUETTE

Interrupt and leave a conversation appropriately

INDEPENDENCE

Decide whether to play with a group, another peer, or by yourself

What kind of life do you envision for your child? Whether it’s happiness, affluence, or academic achievement, self-confidence will be integral.

"You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn't exist anywhere except in the mind. "
-Dale Carnegie

Studies show that primary school children who were confident performed better at school and bagged academic achievements regardless of their age, cognitive ability, and gender. Like Rome, confidence isn’t built in a day. It requires a nurturing environment, the right training, and consistent practice and encouragement. curaFUN games and comics employ a scientifically based and systematic approach to building confidence starting with guided practice with professional feedback in social initiation, peer interaction, and confronting bullies.

The World Belongs To Those Who Believe In Themselves!

Social Skill

Successful People Have One Thing in Common: High Self-Confidence

But how does one develop strong self confidence?
As a society, we chase after self-confidence and try to promote it in children by giving out participation awards in the fear of leaving any child feeling left out. But do abundant encouragement and praise result in higher self confidence?

In a recent study, children who had a positive but inaccurate perception of their performance were more susceptible to being depressed than those who had a more realistic rating of their performance. Undeserved praise can lead to a flawed portrayal of oneself, which may eventually lead to poor self-esteem. Rather than dishing out unwarranted or unmerited praise, parents can encourage children by urging them to stretch and grow, trying new things and challenging themselves often.

Emotional Intelligence Games

Gamified cognitive psychology principles | Effectively improve social and emotional intelligence

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo Academy

$ 25 / year

5 TO 7 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo U

$ 25 / year

7 TO 11 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition
Autistic and Gifted: How to Support a Twice-Exceptional Child

Autistic and Gifted: How to Support a Twice-Exceptional Child

Autism and giftedness can go hand in hand. Twice-exceptional kids have great ability, but they also face certain challenges. Giftedness and autism share some qualities, like intellectual excitability and sensory differences. Some kids have these qualities because they’re both gifted and autistic. If your child is nonverbal and shies away from eye contact and touch but can play piano concertos after hearing them only once, it’s easy to spot the coexistence of autism and giftedness. It’s usually not that obvious, though. Not all autistic kids avoid eye contact or shun hugs, and many are great conversationalists. Meanwhile, only a few gifted kids are prodigies with exceptional recall. It’s more likely you’ve noticed that your child has some impressive, detailed knowledge about a focused interest, plus they show bouts of emotional intensity or sensory issues that are common in gifted children. Giftedness is extraordinary ability, high IQ, or both. It’s a neurological sensitivity that changes the way a person experiences the world. Gifted children:
  • learn faster and more easily
  • get bored very quickly
  • feel emotions and physical sensations more intensely
  • remember things more acutely
  • think and reason with increased complexity
  • need challenge, change, and novelty
  • experience social isolation
  • are detached from social norms
The IQ level that is considered gifted, or having higher intellectual abilities, is 130 or higher. This is within the top 2% of the population. IQ isn’t the only factor used to assess cognitive level because IQ tests can measure only your functioning at the time of the test. If you are ill or distracted by stress or troubling thoughts, you might not score as well as you could. This is why psychologists perform full assessments and not only IQ tests when they identify giftedness. Giftedness and high scholastic achievement are not the same. With discipline and good study habits, a student with an “average” IQ can earn excellent grades in school. Meanwhile, a gifted student can struggle in school and underachieve. This is often because they are: Gifted kids aren’t always very motivated by grades. Instead, they may care more about the things they consider relevant, important, or interesting. Without early acceleration, gifted children may experience lower grades as they get older. If their early schoolwork is too easy, they don’t have the opportunity to learn study skills and work ethic. As the difficulty level of subject material increases, their grades can drop. Other differences ... Read More
Developing Emotional Intelligence in Children

Developing Emotional Intelligence in Children

Emotional Intelligence means we are in tune with our emotions and use this information to deal with them in the most effective and healthy way possible. The challenges of the past few weeks, and uncertainty of the near future is possibly some of the most emotionally difficult time you and your family have experienced. There has been a great deal of information written specifically on how to help children through this time and bring a sense of normalcy into their lives. As this process unfolds, the challenges will continue, and our "normal" will be forever changed. To help our children and ourselves move through and grow from this time, we can give some extra thought to the concept of Emotional Intelligence; what it means, why it is important and how do we help it develop? Emotional Intelligence means we are in tune with our emotions and use this information to deal with them in the most effective and healthy way possible. It means we understand other people's emotions and actions and can respond to them appropriately and with empathy. Research has shown Emotional Intelligence contributes to success in life. Here are some of the general concepts for raising Emotionally Intelligent children with some specific insights to the current Coronavirus situation. Awareness Of Your Own Emotions Knowing and recognizing your feelings as they arise.
  • Can you express your feelings with appropriate words, and do you model this for your children?
  • Are you tuned into your child's emotions, and can you help them understand and identify what they are feeling?
  • Do you help them label their feelings and try to understand the reason they may be feeling that way?
  • Do you listen to what they are saying and how they are feeling and validate those feelings as real?
There are so many helpful articles about understanding our feelings now. Read what helps you. Take time to reflect on your own feelings and help your children reflect on theirs. Remember to keep it at their age level. Always remember there are no "wrong" feelings. Managing Your Own Emotions Handling feelings so they are expressed in ways that are constructive.
  • Are you able to manage and control your emotions (for the most part) even during difficult times?
  • Do you recognize when your child is feeling troubled and can you help them begin to learn to handle their emotions?
  • Can you model ... Read More
10 Evidence-backed Tips to Teach Kids Focus and Concentration

10 Evidence-backed Tips to Teach Kids Focus and Concentration

Teaching kids to listen, focus, follow instructions, keep rules in mind and practice self-control Adele Diamond, a well-known Professor whose studies have focused on self-regulation, argues that children should be taught to: 1. Develop self-control, i.e., they should learn to do what is appropriate rather than what they want to do. 2. Develop the working memory, i.e., they should be helped to hold information in memory while mentally incorporating new information. 3. Develop cognitive flexibility, i.e., they should learn to think outside the box. Diamond believes that teaching self-regulation skills can help improve children’s concentration and focus. These skills can help your child learn to follow instructions and persist even when they encounter enormous challenges. Other studies have found that self-regulated children are able to listen, pay attention, think, then act. Everything you need to know to help your child focus and concentrate better “My child won’t concentrate on anything” is a rather common parenting complaint. While a child’s inability to focus is usually a common cause of concern, all children are easily distracted and generally have shorter attention spans than adults. They are more curious and more easily distracted when they feel little interest for the tasks and activities they are asked to do. Children’s concentration tends to improve as they grow older and develop their self-control skills. That said, some children struggle more with focusing and resisting distractions. The problem with children’s lack of attention is that it contributes to their learning and to their day to day lives. So first let’s look at what may be behind your child’s inability to pay attention. Some of the common causes of children’s lack of focus and concentration 1) Anxiety may be the reason your child can’t concentrate Anxiety is a common but often ignored cause of inattention among children described as “unfocused”, and this actually makes perfect sense. It is not uncommon for anxiety to “block” your child, meaning that listening to and following instructions may be more complicated for such a child. Your child’s separation anxiety or worry about doing something wrong at school or even embarrassing or humiliating themselves may mean that they are more likely to have difficulty paying attention. 2) Insufficient sleep has an impact on your child’s ability to concentrate It is a well-known fact that poor sleeping habits have a negative impact on children’s focus and concentration. If you think that your child’s ... Read More
The Importance of Developing Emotional Intelligence for Kids

The Importance of Developing Emotional Intelligence for Kids

Empathy is about finding echoes of another person in yourself.” Mohsin Hamid Navigating emotions is a complex activity and often guides one’s thought process and actions. According to researchers Peter Salavoy and John Mayer, emotional intelligence, or the capacity to assess one’s environment and understand one’s emotions and those around them, is a strong indicator of social awareness. As children explore the world around them, they are susceptible of being influenced to form new perspectives and adopt new behaviors. Kids that learn to connect their own experiences to those around them interact in a way that promotes a much safer and trusting environment. By teaching empathy to our children, we encourage a deeper self-awareness of how to cultivate strong relationships and appropriately respond to personal, interpersonal and external situations. Below, we have outlined some strategies, as well as their long-term benefits, that can support your child in developing a higher emotional intelligence and become a more confident and independent individual. How We Can Help Kids Develop Emotional Intelligence We can increase our child’s emotional awareness by encouraging open and candid conversations. Emotion coaching can help a young child deal with difficult emotions. By welcoming our child’s thoughts and concerns, we allow them a space to be vulnerable without judgment and build their emotional literacy. Simply asking “why?” is an effective method of communicating with your child. This gives them the initial opportunity to both examine and dissect the situation independently and understand why they are reacting in a certain manner before receiving your input. This practice also strengthens their social skills, emotional intelligence skills as well as emotional awareness by encouraging them to take the thoughts and feelings of others into consideration while also learning self-control. Emotions can operate on a spectrum, and helping your children identify these layers can be beneficial to their self-awareness. Difficult situations and big feelings arise at any time in children. Your child’s ability to distinguish each different emotion, while also being able to articulate these feelings will help them develop mindfulness and a better understanding of people’s emotions. It is also beneficial to take time to acknowledge your child’s successes and uplift them in times of failure. A child’s ability to pick up parenting cues is no easy feat! Children learn to communicate by watching and mimicking their parents and caregivers, so when you are communicating with another person, emphasize listening over responding. Pause ... Read More
When your child is the bully: Tips for parents

When your child is the bully: Tips for parents

It’s bad for children’s health, makes headlines, and defies most attempts to prevent it. Bullying has become the “big tobacco” of the 21st century. What can a parent do when their child is engaging in behavior that’s condemned by nearly everyone? We talked with Dr. Peter Raffalli, a neurologist and director of the Bullying and Cyberbullying Prevention and Advocacy Collaborative at Boston Children’s Hospital, about kids who bully other kids and what parents can do. What are parents of bullies up against? The first challenge for parents is actually believing that their child is bullying other kids. Contrary to popular belief, bullies are often good-looking, popular kids. Adults often consider them role models for other kids. The myth that bullies are rough, insecure thugs can make it very difficult for parents to believe their popular, confident child is bullying others. What is bullying? Bullying is a series of mean acts carried out against a single person repeatedly over time. Bullying behavior may include:
  • pushing, hitting, tripping
  • name-calling, teasing
  • spreading rumors, exclusion from a group
  • stealing or damaging property
  • sending hurtful messages over text or social media
The next challenge parents face is getting their child to talk about their behavior. Often, when confronted, bullies become defiant. They roll their eyes and refuse to answer questions. They may insist that what they’ve been doing is not bullying or that the other kid deserves it. Understandably, many parents of bullies don’t know what to do to change their child’s behavior. We know that punishing them does not work. Schools can suspend bullies, parents can ground them, but as soon as the punishment ends, the bullying starts again, sometimes worse than it was before. This is why in the bullying clinic, we recommend a therapeutic, rather than punitive, approach to bullying. What motivates kids to bully other kids? Some kids bully out of a need to be the top dog at school or in their social circle. They pick on kids they perceive as weak — kids who are shy or ‘different’ or don’t have a lot of friends. No matter what sets their victims apart, kids who bully have more power and use bullying to maintain it. Sometimes kids who bully have a neurodevelopmental disorder like attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They have trouble handling frustration and controlling their impulses. Ironically, this can also put them in the sightline ... Read More
Supporting a Child in the Five Areas of Emotional Intelligence

Supporting a Child in the Five Areas of Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence is the ability to understand and manage our own emotions and the emotions of others. Its development is distinct from the development of academic intelligence and a child can benefit from the positive impact on success and wellbeing that it can provide. A child experiencing some of the less helpful characteristics common in high learning potential children, such as the tendency towards perfectionism, social challenges, or worry and anxiety, could benefit greatly from the mitigating effect of the development of their emotional intelligence. In our blog Emotional Intelligence and High Learning Potential we looked at what emotional intelligence is and its impact on children with high learning potential. In this article we look in more detail at the five key skill areas identified as constituting emotional intelligence by psychologist Dr Daniel Goleman:
  1. Self-awareness: the ability to recognise your own emotions (and how they affect not just yourself but others around you).
  2. Self-regulation: the ability to remain in control of your actions, whatever emotions you may be feeling.
  3. Motivation: the ability to persevere in your pursuits, even in the face of difficulties.
  4. Empathy: the ability to understand and respond to the emotions of others.
  5. Social skills: the ability to use emotional intelligence in the context of interpersonal relationships.
Self-Awareness Being able to understand their emotions: what they are, why they are experiencing them and then what to do in response to them, goes a long way in building up emotional intelligence. You can help your child by discussing your own emotions; by modelling emotionally intelligent behaviour, showing them that it is okay to have all different kinds of emotions and that we can respond to them in a positive manner. Talk to them about how you feel; about how they feel, and about both the big and the small emotions, in order to take the fear of the unknown out of the equation. This can be of immense help to a child who may previously have found it difficult to discuss their feelings. Modelling behaviour in this way can show them that the world does not end when we admit to our emotions; that, in fact, it becomes a whole lot easier to navigate once we do not fear our feelings. Validate their own emotions, and their intensity, and make such discussions so regular that the whole process becomes comfortable, normalised, almost automatic, and certainly significantly ... Read More
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