Confidence

Nurturing Healthy Self Esteem in Children | curaJOY

Confidence is a social emotional skill and can be nurtured, practiced, and learned. It helps children feel secure, capable and high-achieving. A University of Melbourne study showed a definite, positive correlation between belief in oneself and success or achievement. Confident children grow up to become successful adults, empowered to face life’s challenges and achieve their most lofty goals.

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Studies show that primary school children who were confident performed better at school and bagged academic achievements regardless of their age, cognitive ability, and gender. Like Rome, confidence isn’t built in a day. It requires a nurturing environment, the right training, and consistent practice and encouragement. curaJOY games and comics employ a scientifically based and systematic approach to building confidence starting with guided practice with professional feedback in social initiation, peer interaction, and confronting bullies.

Confidence nears the top of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. The need for respect, esteem, and confidence, is a requirement for all well-functioning human beings. When your child’s basic needs for survival are met, giving them opportunities to feel justly praised, recognized, and competent helps facilitate healthy development. Every parent wants the best for their children, and confidence is at the core. We have taken the mystery out of building confidence by developing programs that work and re-invented them in interactive games and comics to eliminate the struggle. There is no trait that replaces confidence in children and adults. That is, if your child communicates well and demonstrates self-discipline and empathy, he will still need to develop his self-confidence in order to achieve success. At curaJOY, we help parents raise confident children who trust themselves, are comfortable in their own skin, and aren’t afraid to go for their goals, starting from social initiation.

“You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind. “
-Dale Carnegie

How confident are you?

Preview of the foundational skills we teach

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

COLLABORATION

Determine who is available and compatible

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

SOCIAL INITIATION

Overcome shyness and social anxiety. Find friends with similar interests and values.

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

PERSEVERENCE

Positively initiate a conversation with a group after being rejected

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

PARTICIPATION

Ask to join a game already in progress. Be flexible when things change.

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

ETIQUETTE

Interrupt and leave a conversation appropriately

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

INDEPENDENCE

Decide whether to play with a group, another peer, or by yourself

children healthy self esteem,confident children,improve my kid confidence,develop confidence in children,parenting confident child

The World Belongs To Those Who Believe In Themselves!

In a recent study, children who had a positive but inaccurate perception of their performance were more susceptible to being depressed than those who had a more realistic rating of their performance. Undeserved praise can lead to a flawed portrayal of oneself, which may eventually lead to poor self-esteem. Rather than dishing out unwarranted or unmerited praise, parents can encourage children by urging them to stretch and grow, trying new things, and challenging themselves often.

Emotional Intelligence Games

Gamified cognitive psychology principles | Effectively improve social and emotional intelligence

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo Academy

$ 25 / year

5 TO 7 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo U

$ 25 / year

7 TO 11 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

6
out of 10 top
skills

concluded by the World Economic Forum as integral for success are social and emotional

11%
increase

in academic performance as a result of social emotional learning

About 1 in every 100 children in China has autism, a prevalence on par with that in the United Kingdom and somewhat shy of that in the United States , according to a new study 1 . The findings suggest that autism is more common in China than previously thought.Autism was not recognized in China…

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ECE or Early Child Education is considered to be a crucial period in child development. Although not mandatory by the Unites States Department of Education, the early childhood education is a fundamental stage in the learning. The National Association for Early Childhood Education for Young Children (NAEYC) defines early childhood as occurring before the age…

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There’s nothing like family. The people we’re related to by blood and marriage are expected to be our closest allies, our greatest sources of love and support. Too often, however, our interactions with family are filled with misunderstanding and resentment, bickering and badgering. Those we should know and be known by best, end up feeling…

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Raising happy kids is one of the most difficult experiences that separated couples face. How do you assure your kids that they are loved and that they are not to blame for the divorce? Besides, the psychological trauma that kids face during and after divorce leaves them in worry and fear that their remaining parent…

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I learned a lot about myself during lockdown, particularly in terms of my relationship with food. I have always had a problem with binge eating – gorging on junk food to palliate emotional lows. This destructive habit reached its nadir during the winter months of last year, when my life might as well have been…

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Twentieth century has seen accelerating growth in technological advancements. It has seen the rise of mass media – television, radio, movies, internet, video games, and social networking. All these have become vital in our everyday functioning. With respect to Covid-19 lockdown, they have also become our solace on dull and boring days. Media exposure has…

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Search “toxic parents” on Instagram, and you’ll find more than 38,000 posts, largely urging young adults to cut ties with their families. The idea is to protect one’s mental health from abusive parents. However, as a psychoanalyst, I’ve seen that trend in recent years become a way to manage conflicts in the family, and I…

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ADHD has no “cure” — nor should it. Managing ADHD is not about fitting in or calming down; it is about standing out — identifying your competitive advantages and developing those strengths into skills that will help you achieve your personal goals. Over 15 years of treating adults with ADHD, I have identified six interventions…

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Admissions rates are falling quite dramatically, and not just at the nation’s top 10 schools. Mt. Holyoke’s overall acceptance rate dropped 15 points, from 51% in 2017 to 36% in 2019. NYU’s fell from 28% to 16% in the same two years. For a survey of some of the […] Admissions rates are falling quite…

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With things slowly opening up, for some, the feelings of social anxiety may intensify. Certain situations can be very stressful for children, which can heighten feelings of anxiety. There is a continuum for anxiety levels: on one end there is healthy anxiety that helps the child succeed in daily tasks; and on the other end…

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Preview of the foundational skills we teach

Training List

COLLABORATION

Determine who is available and compatible

Training List

SOCIAL INITIATION

Overcome shyness and social anxiety. Find friends with similar interests and values.

Training List

PERSEVERENCE

Positively initiate a conversation with a group after being rejected

Training List

PARTICIPATION

Ask to join a game already in progress. Be flexible when things change. 

Training List

ETIQUETTE

Interrupt and leave a conversation appropriately

INDEPENDENCE

Decide whether to play with a group, another peer, or by yourself

What kind of life do you envision for your child? Whether it’s happiness, affluence, or academic achievement, self-confidence will be integral.

"You can conquer almost any fear if you will only make up your mind to do so. For remember, fear doesn't exist anywhere except in the mind. "
-Dale Carnegie

Studies show that primary school children who were confident performed better at school and bagged academic achievements regardless of their age, cognitive ability, and gender. Like Rome, confidence isn’t built in a day. It requires a nurturing environment, the right training, and consistent practice and encouragement. curaFUN games and comics employ a scientifically based and systematic approach to building confidence starting with guided practice with professional feedback in social initiation, peer interaction, and confronting bullies.

The World Belongs To Those Who Believe In Themselves!

Social Skill

Successful People Have One Thing in Common: High Self-Confidence

But how does one develop strong self confidence?
As a society, we chase after self-confidence and try to promote it in children by giving out participation awards in the fear of leaving any child feeling left out. But do abundant encouragement and praise result in higher self confidence?

In a recent study, children who had a positive but inaccurate perception of their performance were more susceptible to being depressed than those who had a more realistic rating of their performance. Undeserved praise can lead to a flawed portrayal of oneself, which may eventually lead to poor self-esteem. Rather than dishing out unwarranted or unmerited praise, parents can encourage children by urging them to stretch and grow, trying new things and challenging themselves often.

Emotional Intelligence Games

Gamified cognitive psychology principles | Effectively improve social and emotional intelligence

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo Academy

$ 25 / year

5 TO 7 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition

StrengthBuilder:

Zoo U

$ 25 / year

7 TO 11 YEAR-OLDS

Buy English Edition
Buy Mandarin Edition
How to tell if your child is being bullied online and what to do

How to tell if your child is being bullied online and what to do

In addition to possible bullying at school, there is now the added concern for parents of cyberbullying online, which can be difficult to monitor and detect. Anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label found nearly one in five (19%) children aged 10-15 in the UK experience cyberbullying, equating to approximately 764,000 children. That's a huge and worrying number. To help parents navigate online bullying, Envirofone has collaborated with Dr Kalanit Ben-Ari, a child development expert and founder of online parenting community, The Village, to share tips on how to spot if your child is being bullied online and how to approach the situation. How online trolling can affect a child Short term effects "Online trolling can harm a child's sense of safety, joy, and trust in others. It can cause them to withdraw from social interactions, anxiety and be closed off in their bedroom, affecting their self-esteem, mental health, and in some cases their body confidence. If the child has a strong connection with their family, they can reach out to an adult for appropriate support and guidance. Sleeplessness is also a common short-term effect of online bullying." Long term effects "Unfortunately, the effect can even be more devastating when children don’t have a strong connection with their family, and the child or teenager has no educational or emotional support systems to enable them to cope with the situation. This can worsen the long-term consequences of being bullied. Such as chronic depression, substance abuse, self-half, and suicidal thoughts/attempts." How to spot the signs your child is being bullied online Changes in your child's behaviour "Changes could include, but are not limited to, anxiety, withdrawal from friends and family, closing themselves off in their bedroom, feeling upset and expressing sadness without a clear reason as to why." They stop taking part in activities "Many victims of online and offline bullying experience that they no longer participate in activities they used to enjoy. This usually ties in with victims of bullying no longer seeing people that they used to. "Look out for an obsession with being online, checking messages all the time, feeling stressed and anxious if they are not able to do so constantly." They are isolating themselves "Your child may appear to be isolating themselves within the home, expressing anger, or showing an unexpected decline in their schoolwork. The signs can vary in intensity and quantity from one child to the next, ... Read More
Comorbid ADHD Complicates Most Diagnoses and Treatment Plans

Comorbid ADHD Complicates Most Diagnoses and Treatment Plans

An accurate ADHD evaluation must screen for far more than ADHD. Though 60 percent of people with ADHD have some co-existing psychiatric condition, comorbidities rarely factor into the evaluation — leading to an incomplete diagnosis. You have ADHD, but what else might you have? Or, no, you do not have ADHD but rather some other condition that explains the symptoms that led you to seek help. This is why checklist evaluations, while helpful screening tools, are inadequate by themselves. You need to sit down and talk to a human being and tell your story. In medical parlance, this is called sharing your history, and your history is the most revealing and useful test in all of medicine. While most mental health professionals do not perform a physical exam, the “history and physical” remains the cornerstone of a medical evaluation. Whether you’ve yet to undergo an ADHD evaluation, or you’ve already been diagnosed with ADHD, be sure to ask your doctor if you might have any of the following comorbid conditions often seen with ADHD: ADHD and Common Coexisting Disorders 1. Learning differences About 30 to 50 percent of people with ADHD have a learning disorder (LD) . These include most of the “dys-eases”.
  • Dyslexia. The most common learning disability, dyslexia makes you slow to learn to read and spell your native language. I have both ADHD and dyslexia, which can manifest quite differently and change over time. For example, I majored in English in college and now make my living with words, even though to this day I am a painfully slow reader.
  • Dyscalculia is sometimes called “math dyslexia.” A person with dyscalculia has trouble with math facts, with counting, with computation, and with word problems. But, just as the dyslexic individual may turn out to be gifted with words, the child with dyscalculia may mature into a gifted mathematician.
  • Dysgraphia includes trouble with handwriting, an awkward way of gripping a pen or pencil, trouble spacing written words or letters, frequent need to erase, and an awkward body position while writing.
  • Dyspraxia, or Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), denotes clumsiness, lack of coordination, a tendency to drop or spill things, awkwardness in movement. DCD often leads to tremendous problems with confidence and self-esteem in childhood and adolescence, when athletic prowess and physical fluidity are so highly valued among peers.
Internet vigilance can protect children, teens from online predators

Internet vigilance can protect children, teens from online predators

Devin Vargas didn’t think there was anything to worry about when interacting with people online. Vargas, like many teenagers, had heard it all before in school assemblies, from parents, or in lectures from people older than them. For many children growing up in a digital age, online safety is something hammered into them from a young age. However, when Vargas was old enough to be in online spaces, things were different than expected. “You’re told in school that predators are going to look a very specific kind of way. They’re going to come and ask for your personal information, but you don’t really expect they’re going to come to you under the guise of friendship,” Vargas said. On social media accounts, Vargas could find people to connect with in ways that felt more authentic than most real-life friendships. Vargas had friends at school, but online friends were different. These friends shared interests and wanted to talk all the time. It didn’t hurt that interacting online helped Vargas feel more confident and free to be themselves. Before long, Vargas had a large circle of online friends who shared interests in music, movies and television. Those friends varied in gender, location and sometimes age. One of the people Vargas interacted with online was an older user who occupied the same internet spaces. This person was in their twenties, but still consumed almost the same content as Vargas. Online, Vargas was used to getting messages often with compliments or conversations. When Vargas messaged this person, he would reply with obscene images. At only sixteen, Vargas was confused why this had happened. The man messaging Vargas said it had been his roommate playing a joke. So, naively, Vargas believed the person. Until it happened again. And another time after that. At that point, Vargas realized it was time to block this individual, but even after doing so, the damage was done. In online spaces, people like the person Vargas interacted with are often hiding online.In a digital age, many children and teenagers have constant internet access. Being online may make them vulnerable to predators, and parents can learn how to stop it. The numbers According to a Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network study conducted on child sexual abuse, one in nine girls and one in 53 boys under the age of 18 have experienced sexual abuse or assault at the hands of an ... Read More
How Many Christmas Presents Should You Buy Your Children?

How Many Christmas Presents Should You Buy Your Children?

One of the most celebrated traditions of Christmas is sharing gifts with your loved ones. For that reason, Christmas is one of the holidays most favored by children, who are often treated to several toys and other gifts on the day. Toy sales in the U.S. soared in 2020, with millions of families kept home by the COVID-19 pandemic. According to a February 2021 statement from the Toy Association: "One silver lining of the pandemic is that it has helped families rediscover the joys of spending time together and find value in bringing play into their daily lives." The association projected that this year families would be "seeking new toys that promote togetherness, as well as inclusive playthings that can be enjoyed by kids of varying abilities and interests," the statement said. But can these toys and other gifts become dangerous for a child's health? Can Too Many Gifts Be Damaging for Your Child? There are different factors to be aware of when it comes to giving your children gifts during the holidays. While it is possible that lavishing your child with Christmas gifts can become detrimental, it isn't likely to "supersede parenting practices that promote resilience," Dr. David Palmiter, a board certified clinical psychologist, told Newsweek. Similar to playing video games, spoiling your child is, of course, unhealthy "but not nearly as damning as some might have imagined, especially if other things are going well in the family," Palmiter explained. The psychologist said the word "spoiled" can be seen as the opposite of the word "disciplined," which in America, "appears to have become conflated with butt-kicking—it isn't," he said. The etymology of the word "disciplined" is "to teach" and Palmiter believes that a foundational teaching, "when it comes to the bullseye of the discipline dart board," is training your children to do things when they don't feel like it. "That particular psychological muscle, when well-developed, goes a long way to helping adults to reach their personal and professional goals. At birth, infants are incapable of discipline. "We hope, as parents, that our child is well capable of it [discipline] by the time they leave home. And, if they are not, they are at high odds to boomerang back home. In this arena, the number of presents a kid receives is unlikely to be a major player," Palmiter explained. How Many Christmas Gifts Should Parents Give Their Kids? The short ... Read More
Cumulative risk exposure and emotional symptoms among early adolescent girls

Cumulative risk exposure and emotional symptoms among early adolescent girls

From early adolescence, girls and women report the highest rates of emotional symptoms, and there is evidence of increased prevalence in recent years. We investigate risk factors and cumulative risk exposure (CRE) in relation to emotional symptoms among early adolescent girls. Four risk factors were found to have a statistically significant relationship with emotional symptoms among early adolescent girls: low academic attainment, special educational needs, low family income, and caregiving responsibilities. CRE was positively associated with emotional symptoms, with a small effect size. Results identify risk factors (outlined above) that are associated with emotional symptoms among early adolescent girls, and highlight that early adolescent girls experiencing a greater number of risk factors in their lives are likely to also experience greater emotional distress. Findings highlight the need for identification and targeted mental health intervention (e.g., individual or group counselling, approaches targeting specific symptoms), for those facing greater risk and/or with emergent symptoms. In early adolescence, evidence suggests that girls begin to experience greater levels of emotional symptoms (i.e., depressive and anxious symptoms) than boys, typically around the age of 12 years[]. Studies show this disparity exists throughout the lifespan; girls and women are twice as likely to report depressive symptoms and disorder from mid-adolescence compared to boys and men []. They are also more likely to experience anxious symptoms and disorders, though this fluctuates based on type of anxiety []. Depressive and anxious symptoms are distinct but strongly inter-related, with high comorbidity rates among adolescents []. Research indicates a significant increase in emotional symptoms and disorder among adolescent girls in recent years, in the United Kingdom [,,,] and other Western and non-Western countries [, ], necessitating urgent research into the factors associated with such difficulties. These studies consistently point to apparent increases in emotional difficulties as a whole (i.e., rather than just depressive or anxious symptomatology) and to increases only among girls, and not among boys in the same cohorts [,,,,,]. Effects have been observed across different points in adolescence, starting in early adolescence []. Typically these increases among girls are small, but as noted by Fink et al. [] the effect is not negligible and warrants attention. We set out to investigate the risk factors associated with emotional symptoms among girls aged 11–12 years, given evidence that such symptoms are increasing among girls. Furthermore, as risk factors tend to co-occur [], we also examined whether exposure to a greater ... Read More
Autistic and Gifted: How to Support a Twice-Exceptional Child

Autistic and Gifted: How to Support a Twice-Exceptional Child

Autism and giftedness can go hand in hand. Twice-exceptional kids have great ability, but they also face certain challenges. Giftedness and autism share some qualities, like intellectual excitability and sensory differences. Some kids have these qualities because they’re both gifted and autistic. If your child is nonverbal and shies away from eye contact and touch but can play piano concertos after hearing them only once, it’s easy to spot the coexistence of autism and giftedness. It’s usually not that obvious, though. Not all autistic kids avoid eye contact or shun hugs, and many are great conversationalists. Meanwhile, only a few gifted kids are prodigies with exceptional recall. It’s more likely you’ve noticed that your child has some impressive, detailed knowledge about a focused interest, plus they show bouts of emotional intensity or sensory issues that are common in gifted children. Giftedness is extraordinary ability, high IQ, or both. It’s a neurological sensitivity that changes the way a person experiences the world. Gifted children:
  • learn faster and more easily
  • get bored very quickly
  • feel emotions and physical sensations more intensely
  • remember things more acutely
  • think and reason with increased complexity
  • need challenge, change, and novelty
  • experience social isolation
  • are detached from social norms
The IQ level that is considered gifted, or having higher intellectual abilities, is 130 or higher. This is within the top 2% of the population. IQ isn’t the only factor used to assess cognitive level because IQ tests can measure only your functioning at the time of the test. If you are ill or distracted by stress or troubling thoughts, you might not score as well as you could. This is why psychologists perform full assessments and not only IQ tests when they identify giftedness. Giftedness and high scholastic achievement are not the same. With discipline and good study habits, a student with an “average” IQ can earn excellent grades in school. Meanwhile, a gifted student can struggle in school and underachieve. This is often because they are: Gifted kids aren’t always very motivated by grades. Instead, they may care more about the things they consider relevant, important, or interesting. Without early acceleration, gifted children may experience lower grades as they get older. If their early schoolwork is too easy, they don’t have the opportunity to learn study skills and work ethic. As the difficulty level of subject material increases, their grades can drop. Other differences ... Read More
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